October Seventh – to Scofton

Spider web on Morse Lock's gear

Spider web on Morse Lock’s gear

Another one of those ‘accidental’ walks. I wandered into town via pond and canal and found myself in the shiny new bus station. There’s loads of places that I could get a free* ride to, but somehow the idea didn’t appeal. So with nothing particularly in mind I meandered off down towards the Priory Church.

*being a certified antique I’ve got a ‘bus pass’

Here’s the walklink complete with all the pics.

Fair

Fair

On the QEII field (aka Bracebridge Recreation Ground, aka Priorswell Recreation Ground; apparently) there’s a ‘fair’. Seems that half a dozen mechanical rides and a couple of hot dog and donut(!) stands constitute a fairground now.
When I were a kid we had real fairs. Anyone remember Farm Grounds on Granville Road? It’s now Sheffield College’s City campus. Time was when there was an annual fair there. There were traditional things like a boxing booth, a bearded lady and similar. I recall one that had all manner of oddments that now are on ‘strange but true’ telly progs and t’internet. Special mention of ‘Hairy Mary covered in hair from head to foot’. Mary turned out to be a small, rather miserable looking monkey. There was also a lot of traditional mud if I recall aright.

Bracebridge Lock

Bracebridge Lock

Bracebridge Lock.

On down* along the canal a plane passed. There’s lots more now that RAF Finningly as it was is now Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield (DSA)link Flybe in particular are using it several times a day to and from all parts of Europe especially the eastern countries.


*it is down but would probably be better to say ‘East’

Flower

Flower

I am often taken by such inconsequential things as this flower. Cow parsley? Wild carrot? I know not what ’tis, but it’s pretty. The self similaritylink intrigues me – the smaller parts being very similar to the larger.

Onwards along the canal, past horses and donkeys in their fields, at the old bridge across the canal, there’s llamas, or they might be alpacas, how do you tell the difference, if there is one?

Heron departing

Heron departing

Beyond the three bridges the heron was standing on the towpath but I didn’t notice it until it flew up as I approached.

There’s a small copse between canal and river. A conker tree overhangs the towpath and the hedge contains its fair share of wild life.

Manton turnover bridgelink marks the western end of Osberton’s lands.

Overhead

Another plane passing by above.

Pretty horse

Pretty horse

Looks rather like S Fry’s “attractive horse”link. (still blocked by S Fry Esq on Twitter. Dunno why -not worried by it.)

What flower?

What flower?

There’s quite a few of these pinkly purple flowers around – again I have to plead ignorance as to their identification.

Two bridges serve Osberton Hall, Long Bridge is an arched brick construction while Stables Bridge appears to be wooden beams laid across two piers.
Just beyond the bridges was (were?) a pair of kingfishers but they were too quickly away, leaving little stains of blue on my memory.

Osberton Lock and bridge is another ‘turnover’, allowing the horse and narrowboat to pass without being unhitched.

The towpath gate is new; it replaces a stile which my old bones didn’t care for. Actually it’s my knees and hips that don’t care for bending. The bywash makes an island for what was the lock keeper’s house to stand on.

The bridge over the River is supplemented by a ford. Presumably the heavier and wider agricultural machines use it. Across the fields the first sighting of Scofton Church.

Church of St. John, Scofton and Osberton

Church of St. John, Scofton and Osberton

Through the village and left along the access path the church stands on a raised area.

I find the West door quite fascinating. Among other decorations it has what seem to be an owl and a pussycat. WHY? I can find no mention on t’internet (nor of any pea green boat). The Church’s listed building pagelink.

Walking back home along the green lane that turns into Rayton Lane at the Worksop end. At first sight there’s little to see but chestnut trees full of fruit – and the remains of the International Horse Trialslink about which I was totally ignorant until a week later.

The chestnuts are amazingly prickly, it’s very hard to pick them up without being punctured to the nth degree. I managed to chuck a couple into my pack and photographed them later at home. The birds were roosting, and squabbling, on a dead limb emerging from the foliage high above.

Distant deer

Distant deer

Further along there were deer a goodish distance away in what looked like a recently reaped field. There were birds scurrying about as well, probably pheasants.

A couple of planes passed overhead, Unusually for so large a plane, one was propeller driven. The other came rather low and banked sharply.

Don’t know if the vegetables are turnips or swedes or even mangelwurzles but there’s rather a lot of ’em. The crop lines demonstrate perspective excellently.

Leg warmers

Leg warmers

There’s a small field to the side of what is now Rayton Lane which is home to Chickens, donkeys and, from time to time, goats. The feathered legs on this chicken amused me.

Birds on the wire

Birds on the wire

Did you ever wonder how birds can cope with sitting on high voltage wires? It’s because there’s no current flowing through themlink.

Back on home ground, there’s a cat optimistically hoping for a duck or moorhen supper.
On the roof of the flour mill pigeons are roosting.
At Worksop Town Lock Nb Carpe Jugulum. (if you can’t tell me where that name comes from then I possibly don’t love you any more)
A final plane passing above, this one with wheels down for landing.

2 thoughts on “October Seventh – to Scofton

  1. I did go to the fair when I was little. I think. Otherwise how do I know what a fair is?
    I don’t know whether it was the one on Granville Road.
    There’s a fair in Tideswell every year during Wakes Week. But I don’t go.
    There was a fair in Kirkcudbright, and we went to that so that photos could be taken. When these photos are “ready”, and if I get them sent to me, I’ll forward a few to you.
    One of the Isles of Fleet had been mown. I would have given a lot to see that happen. It’s not just the enjoyment of watching other people work – I’d like to know whether a tractor was driven across at low tide, or?
    T

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    • That’s the only fair that I recall so …
      Fairs nowadays are rubbish as I hope came through my screed above.
      Don’t think the isles can be reached by wheels at even the lowest of tides but I’m probably wrong; I often am. Rather like the idea of scythes at dawn though.
      R

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