It’s still September

If I’m not careful I’ll catch up with myself, blogging at this rate.
 
 
 

Tuesday 20th September ’16


A “Grade ‘A’, grey day”* on the pond. What’s the correct spelling of GREY (or GRAY) anyhow? Apparently gray is used more in the U.S of A. but grey elsewhere although either is OK wherever you are. see herelink.
Ivy flowers have pollen covered stamens to coat wasps, bees, flies and hoverflies when they come for the nectar.
The seeds of the sycamore spiral slowly down helicoptering as they go. The low speed of descent allows the wind to carry them far afield. I hate sycamores. They spring up any- and every-where and grow so fast that other trees have little chance to compete. Continue reading

September – first week

On again. Don’t forget you can click the pics to see ’em bigger.

Thursday September First 2016

More of the same, or at least similar.


There’s one south facing grassy slope that has grasshoppers skulking in warm weather.
Spiders build webs in the brambles alongside the paths around the pond.
There’s aircraft overhead most of the day. This is one of the small ones.
Usually its the coots that fight but here they’re looking on while a couple of female (or juvenile?) mallards have at it.
This has got to be the prickliest plant around. Continue reading

August back end

Thought I’d better do some bloggin’ or folk’ll think I’ve snuffed it. Starting from t’ end of August.
Here goes (click the pics to see ’em bigger)(All pics are on Flickrlink, where they’re bigger than here)
 
 
 

Wednesday 31st August ’16

Wednesday: Wodnesdæg: Woden’s day
“When gorse is out of bloom, kissing’s out of fashion.” As I was told some short time ago.
It’s the start of spider season. At least the fat bodied ones that create webs in the brambles. Speaking of which, there’s more and more blackberries; “mellow fruitfulness”† indeed. Continue reading

Another bit of April

Still playing catch up with just the pics.
Mouse over for captions, click for bigger.


On some of my walks I use “map my walkLINK” you can join for nowt and then see where I’ve been. I’ll link when I remember – click on ‘MMW’.


April continues

Eighteenth

Nineteenth

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Twentieth

Twentyfirst

Twentysecond

Twentythrid

Twentyfourth

Twentyfifth

MMW

Next few days of March

Don’t forget to click the pics to see ’em bigger.

 

Monday 14th March ’16

Flickrlink

Blackthorn is really beginning to bloom everywhere now.
Think there are four grebes(great crested obviously) on the pond but there might be more. They move so quickly underwater that, unless you see two at the same time, you can’t really tell.
This was a Molly Walking day and quite warm. She enjoys paddling to have a drink without having to bend down.
Here’s three grebes at once. If I recall correctly, I did catch sight of four at once but not on camera. Continue reading

A Week of Wazzocking

Don’t forget to click the pics to see ’em bigger.

Monday the Seventh of March Twenty Sixteen


Another of those panorama shots of the pond. Getting fed up with ’em yet? Tough!
Starlings are really underrated, they’re beautiful birds.
Think this is a pair of great crested grebes. (As opposed to just two hanging about together) Continue reading

Thirteenth of February and beyond

 

Thirteen is, to Westerners at least, an unlucky number.Let me google that for you I always thought that the only reason was the presence, as the thirteenth to arrive, of Judas Iscariot at the ‘last supper’. Like so many things bible related though this turns out to be only part of the story. A lot of the reasoning lies with the idea, prevalent from Babylonian times at least, that twelve was a ‘perfect’ number. Think of twelve months in a year and twice twelve hours in a day – inherited from the Babylonians. So adding one to perfection could only mar it.
Apparently there was a similar thirteenth visitor at a Norse God’s feast: Loki the trickster.
Apollo 13 – say no more!
Fear of the number thirteen has its own name: Triskaidekaphobia.
Friday 13th is a whole other kettle of fish.

 
 
 
On with the pics. Please click on ’em or visit the linked Flickr page to see ’em bigger.
Continue reading